News & Notes

HPC Resources: Music

In an effort to keep in touch with you throughout the week, the HPC Staff has decided to make a post to the blog each week with resources. Every week, the leader of a different ministry area will post some resources - songs, articles, books, interesting thoughts - that he or she has been diving into lately. We pray that this will be an edifying practice both for ourselves as a staff and for members of the congregation. 

With that, here is my list of resources for the week relating to the Music Ministry at HPC. 

We have entered into the season of Lent, and although we are not walking through this season corporately, I know that many of us do devotionals and readings tied to this liturgical season. With that in mind, I recommend this post by John Witvliet, the Director of the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, titled Yes And No: Lent in the Reformed Faith Today (click here). This article gives a history of Reformed thinking on Lent and provides some interesting insights both for those who are familiar and unfamiliar with the season.

If you are interested in scripture readings tied to Lent, you might try following the Revised Common Lectionary. Readings for Sundays are here and readings for each day of the week are here.

 

For some more music-specific resources, lately I have really been enjoying listening to albums by Cardiphonia Music. They often take scripture and set it to music word-for-word. Some examples include an album of Canticles found throughout scripture, Songs for the Sojourn Vol. 1 & 2 using the Psalms of Ascent, Psalms 135-150 Vol. 1, among many others.

Lately, though, I've really been enjoying the Hallel Psalms album (Psalms 113-118). This album is a compilation with many contributors, and I would venture to say that anybody can find one song that they enjoy on it. There are songs musically inspired by folk, americana, rock, alternative, country, and gospel but tied together by the texts used. You won't like every song on here, but I guarantee you'll find one or two you really enjoy.

And finally, my highest recommendation for the week is a new(ish) album by Greg LaFollette titled Songs of Common Prayer. Greg bounced around several denominations before ending up at an Anglican Church for the last several years. He was inspired by the Book of Common Prayer and set the words to contemporary music. I love that the text is simple but profound, and the musical setting is extraordinarily tasteful. For an interview of Greg by the Gospel Coalition, click here. The Spotify playlist is embedded below for your convenience. 

I encourage you to take a listen to some of these songs and let me know what you think!

In Christ,

Patrick